How Much Does Power Steering Hose Replacement Cost?

The two main components of an automotive power steering system are the power steering pump and the rack and pinion or steering gearbox. These two main components are connected by two hoses – one that supplies pressurized fluid from the pump and one that returns fluid to the pump.

There are often several other lines in the system as a whole; mostly solid. However, the two main ones connecting to the power steering pump on the engine are flexible rubber or synthetic.

This is to allow for the movement and vibration of the engine relative to the frame the steering mechanism attaches to. The most common reason for replacing the hoses is if they leak.

Steering Hose

Usually, the power steering lines are more or less accessible at the power steering pump to be undone. They are often somewhat less accessible underneath where they attach at the steering gearbox or rack and pinion, or at a power steering fluid cooler if that is used.

Very often, there are attaching clips and details involved. Replacing the hoses will usually drain most of the power steering fluid which then, must be replaced.

Costs of Power Steering Hose Replacement

To illustrate, below are some examples of the cost to fix power steering leak on some common vehicles using $100 per hour as labor rate:

  • For a 2002 Toyota Corolla with a 1.8-liter engine, the estimated labor time to replace a power steering pressure hose is around 1.4 hours. A factory replacement part costs about $330 and a Sunsong replacement part is about $27. The total cost to complete the job is around $470 using OE parts and around $167 using aftermarket parts. To replace a power steering return line for the same vehicle, the estimated labor time is around 0.7 of an hour. A factory replacement part costs about $228 and a Sunsong part costs about $26. The total cost to complete the job is around $298 using OE parts and about $96 using aftermarket parts.
  • For a 2008 BMW 328i with a 3.0-liter engine, the estimated labor time to replace a power steering pressure hose is around 1.2 hours. A factory replacement part costs about $307 and a Rein part costs about $145. The total cost to complete the job is around $427 using OE parts and about $265 using aftermarket parts. To replace a power steering return line for the same vehicle, the estimated labor time is around 0.9 of an hour. A factory replacement part costs about $110 and a Rein part costs about $47. The total cost to complete the job is around $200 using OE parts and about $137 using aftermarket parts.
  • For a 2006 Ford Explorer with a 4.6-liter engine, the estimated labor time to replace a power steering pressure hose is around 1.9 hours. A factory replacement part is about $74 and a Sunsong part is about $21. The total cost to complete the job is around $264 using OE parts and about $211 using aftermarket parts. To replace a power steering return line for the same vehicle, the estimated labor time is around an hour. A factory part is about $21 while aftermarket parts are not generally available. The total cost to complete the job is around $121.
  • For a 2006 Chevrolet Impala with a 3.9-liter engine, the estimated labor time to replace a power steering pressure hose is around 1.4 hours. A factory replacement part costs about $67 and a Gates part costs about $21. The total cost to complete the job is around $207 using OE parts and about $161 using aftermarket parts. To replace a power steering return line for the same vehicle, the estimated labor time is around 0.9 of an hour. A factory replacement part costs about $24 and a Gates part costs about $26. The total cost to complete the job is around $114 using factory parts and about $116 using aftermarket parts.

To all of the above power steering leak repair costs, roughly $20 can be added for a quart or more of power steering fluid. There are also often other hoses and lines in power steering systems. However, the above estimates are for the pressure and return lines running directly to and from the power steering pump.

Power Hose

Related Issues

Most power steering systems simply require a refill after hose replacement and a brief procedure of running and topping off to purge air from the system. Some are more complicated, especially if a power steering fluid cooler is used and may require a vacuum device to evacuate air or a more extended purge procedure. This should be included in any labor time given for parts replacement.

One of the more important details of the procedure is the replacement of the seals at the line ends. Typically, the pressure lines would use double flared fittings while the suction line would use o-ring seals.

Failure to replace the suction line o-rings is one of the more common errors and not entirely easy to diagnose after the fact. A suction line will typically not leak oil as it isn’t under pressure in operation.

However, it can pull air into the system, leading to noisy operation and otherwise unexplainable difficulties with the normally simple air-purge procedure. Sometimes, seals are billed as additional parts but the cost is generally inconsequential.

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