How Much Does an Ignition Switch Replacement Cost?

If you’ve lost your keys, it’s a good idea to take your vehicle to dealerships to have them delete the keys from your car’s computer system. Doing this would prevent whoever found your keys from unlocking the doors with the fob.

They can also start the ignition with the key, but they could still unlock the door, trunk, and glove box with the key. This would require buying replacement keys and having them programmed at your dealer.Ignition switch

If someone has stolen your vehicle and you’ve then got it back in your possession, it’s a good idea to have all the lock cylinders on the vehicle replaced. Most dealerships will offer a kit that will come with all brand new lock cylinders and keys with a new key code.

By having this done at the dealership, the new key code will be registered to your VIN or Vehicle Identification Number. Also, if you ever need a replacement key, they will be able to cut you a new key matching the new cylinders now installed on your vehicle.

How Much Should It Cost?

Labor can range from very little to a lot, depending on which component is being replaced. Also, it is dependent on location.

Assume a labor rate of $100 an hour for an independent shop and $150 an hour for a dealership. Additional fees may be required if rekeying the lock cylinder is needed or if the new ignition switch needs to be programmed to the vehicle.

  • 2008 Chevrolet Impala

The labor time to replace the ignition switch is estimated at 0.9 hours and 0.6 hours to remove and replace the ignition lock cylinder, not including rekeying labor.

To replace the ignition switch assembly at an independent shop, the labor would cost around $90 and the switch assembly can range between $60 and $100 depending on the brand. This aftermarket ignition switch comes with the lock cylinder and keys. If you wish to have the new lock cylinder match the original keys, you would be charged an additional hour of labor to rekey the new lock cylinder.

At the dealership, the labor would cost around $135 for just the ignition switch service and the ignition switch price alone would be between $25 and 40. With this repair done at the dealership, just the switch can be replaced, whereas, aftermarket parts would be the entire ignition switch assembly.

If you only need the lock cylinder replaced at the dealership, the labor would be around $240 to remove the old lock cylinder and rekey the new lock cylinder. The lock cylinder at the dealership can range between $50 and 90.

  • 2011 Honda Civic

The labor is estimated at around 1 hour to replace just the switch portion. If the housing or lock cylinder is being replaced, it is estimated at 1.5 hours, not including rekeying labor.

At the independent shop, the labor to replace just the switch would be around $100. Just the ignition switch cost would range between $25 and $40 for an aftermarket switch; no programming required.

If a lock cylinder is needed, it would cost $150 in labor and a full ignition switch assembly (housing, switch, lock cylinder and new keys) would range between $150 and $225. Rekeying the new lock cylinder would cost extra, and the new ignition switch assembly may need to be programmed.

At the dealership, the labor for just the switch component would cost around $150, and just the switch part can range between $50 and $100. If the entire assembly or the lock cylinder needs to be replaced, you would need to buy the entire assembly.

The labor to replace the entire assembly would cost around $225 and the cost of the assembly would range between $375 and 425. Rekeying the new lock cylinder would cost extra, and the new ignition switch assembly will need to be programmed at an additional cost.

If your 2011 Honda Civic was stolen and you need to replace all the lock cylinders on your car, it would be an additional 1.9 hours to replace the front door lock cylinders, trunk lock cylinder, and the glove box lock cylinder. This would be on top of the 1.5 hours to replace the ignition lock cylinder.

Most dealerships/manufacturers offer a full kit that will come with new keys that match all lock cylinders being replaced. These kits are typically only available at the dealership, and the cost for the kit can range between $600 and $S700 not including labor.

If done at the dealership, they will update the new key configuration to your VIN so if you are ever in need of just a replacement key, they will be able to get you one.

  • 2014 Toyota Camry

The labor to replace the ignition switch assembly is estimated at 2.1 hours and the labor to replace just the lock cylinder is 0.8 hours.

At the independent shop, the labor to replace the ignition switch assembly would be around $210 and the switch assembly would range between $100 and $150 for an aftermarket switch assembly. Programming may be required.

The lock cylinder alone is not an available part. However, if the lock cylinder needs to be rekeyed, it would cost $80 in labor to remove the lock cylinder and an additional hour of labor to rekey it.

At the dealership, the labor for the entire ignition switch assembly would cost around $315 and the entire assembly would range between $150 and $250 depending on which type of ignition switch your vehicle has as there are two options.

Additional Costs That Might Be Required

Depending on the vehicle and the manufacturer’s security system, you may have to have the ignition switch programmed to the vehicle which usually will cost an additional hour of labor.

If you are having your lock cylinder re-keyed to match your original key, most dealerships and independent shops will charge an additional hour to perform this. These two additional hours are usually an additional cost and are not built in to how much to fix ignition switch assembly.

Older vehicles don’t require programming the ignition switch assembly or the programming is very simple and does not require any special software or scan tools. On the other hand, most modern vehicles 2007 and up will likely need to be programmed by your dealer.

What Is An Ignition Switch?

An ignition switch is the device used to start the engine when a key is inserted into the lock cylinder and turned. The ignition switch is made up of three components.

The first component is the ignition switch housing. The housing is bolted or connected to the steering column and is usually secured with anti-tamper bolts to prevent thieves from removing and bypassing the need for a key.

There may be additional components on the ignition switch housing such as the immobilizer or Anti-Theft key readers or transponder reader. The immobilizer unit reads the transponder inside the key and verifies that it is a key that is registered to the vehicle.

The second component is the lock cylinder. This is a cylinder that has little springs and tumblers that when the correct key is inserted into the cylinder, the tumblers lineup on the different grooves on the key and allow the lock cylinder to be turned.

The wrong key will not allow the tumblers to slide into position; making it impossible to turn the lock cylinder. If a thief manages to break the lock cylinder and tries to start the car, the immobilizer/ant-theft unit will prevent the engine from starting.

The third component the ignition switch. The switch is either connected to the back of the housing or integrated into the housing itself. On some cars this is a serviceable component and on other cars the entire switch assembly needs to be replaced.

So Which Component Do You Need To Replace? 

If your key goes into the lock cylinder but doesn’t turn or binds when trying to turn, it’s very likely that your lock cylinder has worn out. Replacing just the lock cylinder is going to save you money, and if you have it re-keyed to match your original key, everything will work just fine.

Many times you won’t have to program the key if only replacing the lock cylinder, which will save you money if you replaced the entire switch assembly.

If your key is able to turn in the ignition switch but the engine does not start, you might have a failed ignition switch. Depending on the vehicle, it may be just the switch component, or it might be the entire assembly. You could also have a bad Anti-Theft/Immobilizer reader that has failed, causing these same symptoms.

The housing is usually only replaced due to it being a full assembly or due to damage from theft. At an independent shop that uses aftermarket parts you’re likely to always get an entire ignition assembly. Aftermarket ignition assemblies come with the switch, the housing, and the lock cylinder with precut keys, however, these keys are not going to match your original keys. The new aftermarket keys will start the car but will not unlock the doors, glovebox or trunk.

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